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Table 2 Summary of results from studies reporting anti-HCV prevalence in pregnant women and first-time blood donors

From: Prevalence of hepatitis C infection among the general population and high-risk groups in the EU/EEA: a systematic review update

Author, year Country Recruiting period Population as reported Age, mean (SD) Sample size Anti-HCV prevalence (%) (95% CI) Risk of selection bias
Pregnant women
 Orkin, 2016 [30] UK 2013 Women who attended antenatal clinics during 2013 at 2 London hospitals 1000 0.50 (0.06–0.94) High risk
 Cortina-Borja, 2016 [31] UK 1 April–30 June 2012 Women delivering live-born infants in the North Thames region in England 31467 0.10 (0.07–0.14) Low risk
 Kopilovic, 2015 [32] Slovenia 1999, 2003, 2009 and 2013 Pregnant women 31849 0.13 (0.09–0.17) Low risk
 Lembo, 2017 [33] Italy January 2010–December 2015 Pregnant women consecutively admitted to the Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the University Hospital of Messina, Italy 5184 0.20 (−) High risk
 Walewska-Zielecka, 2016 [34] Poland 2004–2014 Pregnant women in Poland 33.4(7.9) 42274 1.32 (−) Low risk
 Millbourn, 2017 [35] Sweden October 2013–March 2015 and
October 2013–February 2016
Every pregnant woman and her partner in Orebro county and in Southern part of Stockholm (288,000 and 300,000 inhabitants, respectively) 21379 0.20* (−) Low risk
 Munoz-Gamez, 2016 [36] Spain January–October 2015 Pregnant women in Spain 0.55 (0.55–0.77) Low risk
First-time blood donors
 Velati, 2018 [37] Italy January 2009–December 2015 Voluntary, unpaid first-time donors 1934612 0.09 (0.08–0.09) Low risk
 Politis, 2018 [38] Greece 2010–2016 Blood donor 0.03 (−) High risk
  1. *calculated based on available data