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Table 2 Definition of catheter-related infections [30]

From: De-implementation strategy to Reduce the Inappropriate use of urinary and intravenous CATheters: study protocol for the RICAT-study

Catheter-related infection Definition
Healthcare-associated infection (HAI) Infection where the date of event occurs on or after the 3rd calendar day of admission to an inpatient location, where calendar day 1 is the day of admission
Laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (LCBI) Criterion 1: Patient has a recognized pathogen identified from one or more blood specimens by a culture or non-culture based microbiologic testing method which is performed for purposes of clinical diagnosis or treatment AND organism(s) identified in blood is not related to an infection at another site
Criterion 2: Patient has at least one of the following signs or symptoms: fever >38.0 °C, chills, or hypotension AND organism(s) identified from blood is not related to an infection at another site AND the same common commensal (i.e., diphtheroids [Corynebacterium spp. not C. diphtheriae], Bacillus spp. [not B. anthracis], Propionibacterium spp., coagulase-negative staphylococci [including S. epidermidis], viridans group streptococci, Aerococcus spp., and Micrococcus spp.) is identified from two or more blood specimens drawn on separate occasions
Central line An intravascular catheter that terminates at or close to the heart or in one of the great vessels (aorta, pulmonary artery, superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, brachiocephalic veins, internal jugular veins, subclavian veins, external iliac veins, common iliac veins, femoral veins) which is used for infusion, withdrawal of blood, or hemodynamic monitoring
Central line-associated BSI (CLABSI) A LCBI where the central line was in place for >2 calendar days on the date of event, with day of device placement being Day 1, AND the central line was also in place on the date of event or the day before
Arterial or venous infection (VASC) It must meet at least one of the following criteria:
1. Patient has organisms from extracted arteries or veins identified by a culture or non-culture based microbiologic testing method which is performed for purposes of clinical diagnosis or treatment.
2. Patient has evidence of arterial or venous infection on gross anatomic or histopathologic exam.
3. Patient has at least one of the following signs or symptoms: fever (>38.0 °C), pain, erythema, or heat at involved vascular site AND more than 15 colonies cultured from intravascular cannula tip using semiquantitative culture method.
4. Patient has purulent drainage at involved vascular site.
Urinary tract infection (UTI) Patient has at least one of the following signs or symptoms: fever >38.0 °C, suprapubic tenderness, costovertebral angle pain or tenderness, urinary urgency, urinary frequency, dysuriaa AND urine culture with no more than two species of organisms identified, at least one of which is a bacterium of ≥105 CFU/ml
Indwelling catheter (Foley catheter) A drainage tube that is inserted into the urinary bladder through the urethra, is left in place, and is connected to a drainage bag.
Catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI) A UTI where an indwelling urinary catheter was in place for >2 calendar days on the date of event, with day of device placement being Day 1, AND an indwelling urinary catheter was in place on the date of event or the day before
  1. aAn indwelling urinary catheter in place could cause patient complaints of frequency, urgency, or dysuria, and therefore these cannot be used as symptoms when catheter is in place