Volume 14 Supplement 3

Abstracts from the 2nd International Science Symposium on HIV and Infectious Diseases (HIV SCIENCE 2014)

Open Access

Disseminated cysticercosis in a child: a rare occurrence presenting as meningitis

  • A Arunkumar1Email author,
  • I Vivian Praveen1,
  • HV Prajwala1 and
  • Asha Benakappa1
BMC Infectious Diseases201414(Suppl 3):P49

https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-14-S3-P49

Published: 27 May 2014

Background

Neurocysticercosis, a parasitic disease is one of the commonest causes of focal convulsions. Disseminated cysticercosis (DCC) is amongst its rarest manifestations. Fewer than 50 cases have been described worldwide with less than 10 in children. We report a 9 year old female child with the disease presenting as meningitis.

Case report

A 9 year old female child presented with fever, headache, myalgia for 15 days, vomiting and altered sensorium for 2 days. She was well nourished, disoriented, febrile, had meningeal signs. CSF examination was unremarkable. CT brain was normal. She was treated as viral meningo-encephalitis and improved. Her subsequent admission with similar complaints showed grossly elevated CSF proteins and lymphocytes, MRI brain showed solitary ring enhancing lesion in brain and treated as tuberculous meningitis with tuberculoma. She did not show improvement, presented back with multiple nodules all over the body. Ultra-sonogram revealed them to be subcutaneous and muscular cysticercoses. MRI showed disseminated cysticercoses involving all areas of brain. She was immunocompetent. She was started on oral prednisolone followed by albendazole for a month. She showed improvement, nodules subsided, had convulsions in follow-up visits, and is on regular anticonvulsants.

Conclusion

The main features of DCC include intractable epilepsy, dementia, muscular enlargement, subcutaneous nodules and absence of focal neurological signs. Our case is remarkable because of combination of disseminated neuro and myo-cysticercosis and meningitis. Short duration of complaints with widespread dissemination in an immunocompetent child necessitates further understanding on the disease process and warrants suspicion of cysticercal meningitis in endemic areas.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Pediatrics, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute

Copyright

© Arunkumar et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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