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Open Access

Prevalence of HBV infection in immunocompromised patients on ART nearly equals HBV mono infection in individuals not infected with HIV, Shimla Northern India

  • Aarti Garg1Email author,
  • Vineeta Sharma1,
  • Santwana Verma1,
  • Digvijay Singh1,
  • Anil Kanga1 and
  • Balraj Singh1
BMC Infectious Diseases201414(Suppl 3):P26

https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-14-S3-P26

Published: 27 May 2014

Keywords

Surface AntigenTertiary CareInfected PatientImmunocompromised PatientCare Institute

Background

It is estimated that 5% of the global population is chronically infected with HBV. The rate of HBV-HIV co infection is 10-20% in countries with HBV endemicity. The present study was undertaken to examine the HBV prevalence and HBV-HIV co infection at tertiary care institute, Northern India.

Methods

This is a retrospective study for the duration of five years, 2008-13. The HBV infection was detected using HBsAg (Hepatitis B surface antigen) and HIV/AIDS cases were screened as per NACO, 2007 criteria.

Results

A total of 10,134 cases were screened for detection of HBV infection and among these 1650(16.3%) were receiving ART (anti retroviral therapy) while HIV status was not divulged in 8484 (83.7%). HBsAg positive in 324/10134 (3.20%) cases, out of these HBV mono infection was seen in 264 (2.6%) and co- infection with HIV in 60 (0.6%).The concomitant HIV infections were seen in 3.64% (95 %confidence interval 2.8-4.7) while in HBV mono infections were in 3.1% (95 % confidence interval 2.8-3.4). There is no statistical difference among the two groups (p value >0.05). Among the pediatric age group 0.95% had concomitant HIV infections as against 5.2% with HBV infection alone. The mean age of presentation was 40.39 years. Males had higher prevalence rate of co infection (4.5:1).

Conclusion

Nearly identical prevalence of HBV infection irrespective of HIV infection strongly indicates HIV screening for Hepatitis B infected patients. The presence of undetected co infection shall result in missed cases, incomplete or partial treatment and suboptimal clinical follow up.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Indira Gandhi Medical College (IGMC), Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India

Copyright

© Garg et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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