Volume 14 Supplement 3

Abstracts from the 2nd International Science Symposium on HIV and Infectious Diseases (HIV SCIENCE 2014)

Open Access

Toll like Receptors (TLRs) expression in HIV children

BMC Infectious Diseases201414(Suppl 3):O10

https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-14-S3-O10

Published: 27 May 2014

Background

Immune activation plays vital role in HIV infection and further progression to AIDS, with TLRs primarily involved in this mechanism.

Methods

Twenty eight children with HIV in age group of 18 months-14 years attending anti retroviral clinic and 17 healthy children as controls were included in the study. WHO clinical staging, CD4+ count and Toll like receptors (TLRs) 1, 7, 8, 9 expressions from PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) were studied and correlated with various parameters.

Results

Mean age of study population was 8.08 ± 3.41 years. 75% of patients were in WHO clinical stage I and II, whereas 25% in stage III. 29% HIV children had severe immunosuppression. TLR-1 showed neutral expression in majority (96%) of HIV children. For TLR-7, 53.5% HIV children showed upregulation, whereas 32% and 14.5% showed downregulation and neutral expression, respectively. TLR-8 expression was downregulated in majority (93%) of HIV children. TLR-9 was upregulated in 29% of patients, whereas 71% had neutral expression. Of all the TLRs studied, only TLR-9 had correlation with WHO clinical stage 3 and severe immunosuppression. No correlation of TLR expression was found with age, nutritional status and ART status of patients.

Conclusion

Expression pattern of TLR-7 was similar to adult patients with HIV. ART had no effect on expression profile of TLRs. Children with severe immunosuppression had significant up regulation of TLR-9. Similar correlation was not observed with TLR-1, 7 and 8. Altered expression pattern of TLR might have implications for disease progression in HIV infection.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Pediatrics, IMS, BHU
(2)
Department of Medicine, IMS, BHU
(3)
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Faculty of Science, BHU

Copyright

© Madeshwaran et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Advertisement