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  • ePoster presentation
  • Open Access

Assessment of oxidative stress parameters in HIV infection

  • 1, 2Email author,
  • 1,
  • 3,
  • 1 and
  • 2
BMC Infectious Diseases201414 (Suppl 3) :E28

https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-14-S3-E28

  • Published:

Keywords

  • Oxidative Stress
  • Nitric Oxide
  • Infected Group
  • Active Oxygen Species
  • Oxidative Stress Marker

Background

Both viral and host factors are responsible for oxidative stress in HIV disease, which in turn activates the replication of HIV provirus by various pathways. Oxidizing stress is a pathologic phenomenon resulting from imbalance between the system producing active oxygen species and those defending the organism. The present study was aimed to assess oxidative stress markers in HIV patients.

Methods

The study included 30 HIV sero-positive patients, 30 healthy volunteers served as controls. Patients were categorized on the basis of their absolute CD4 counts into 3 groups - Group-1 (>500 CD4 cells/mm3), Group-2 (200–499 CD4 cells/mm3), and Group-3 (<200 CD4 cells/mm3).Lipid peroxidation was estimated using serum malondialdehyde as a marker, serum nitric oxide levels were assessed by Griess reagent method, serum reduced GSH by Beutler et al, serum C reactive protein, serum AOPP by Witko Savark method and serum proteins by Bradford method. Statistical analysis was done using the Student’s t test and one-way ANOVA.

Results

Significant decrease (p<0.004) in GSH levels and significant increase (p<0.0008) in NO levels was observed in HIV infected group when compared to controls. However, no significant changes were found in levels of AOPP, MDA, and CRP in the study groups. Significant increase (p<0.0001) in MDA levels in group 3and in GSH levels (p<0.0395) in all 3 groups was seen as compared to controls.

Conclusion

The findings indicate that considerable amount of oxidative stress are induced and changes in NO and GSH levels may contribute to the immunopathophysiology during HIV infection.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Biochemistry, Haffkine Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra, 400012, India
(2)
Department of Biochemistry, Seth G.S.Medical College & KEM Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra, 400012, India
(3)
Department of Pathology, Seth G.S.Medical College & KEM Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra, 400012, India

Copyright

© Rajopadhye et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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