Volume 12 Supplement 1

Abstracts from the First International Science Symposium on HIV and Infectious Diseases (HIV SCIENCE 2012)

Open Access

Defective maturation of dendritic cells during HIV-1 infection is associated with increased expression of SOCS-1

BMC Infectious Diseases201212(Suppl 1):P88

https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-12-S1-P88

Published: 4 May 2012

Background

During chronic HIV-1 infection, upregulation in the expression of certain negative regulatory factors has been implicated recently as a cause of defects in dendritic cells (DCs). We aim to study the association of one such factor, the suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1) gene with DC dysfunction during HIV-1 infection.

Methods

DCs from 21 therapy naïve (mean CD4: 256 cells/mm3), 21 patients on anti-retroviral therapy (mean CD4: 342 cells/mm3) and 14 healthy controls were immunophenotyped for maturation markers at baseline and after 5 hour ex vivo stimulation with TLR-4 ligand, LPS, by flowcytometry. Subsequently, the expression of SOCS-1 gene and the cytokine levels were assessed in monocyte-derived DCs (Mo-DC) of healthy donors exposed to LPS and HIV-1 gp120 by real time PCR and flowcytometry respectively.

Results

The myeloid DCs of untreated subjects had significantly lower responsiveness to LPS stimulation as indicated by lower upregulation of CD83 (mean±SE: 31±4.4 vs. 50±3) and CD80 (30±4 vs. 40±3) as compared to healthy controls. Treated patients had a higher upregulation of CD83 (mean±SE: 38±4) and CD80 (mean±SE: 33±3) though not significantly higher than untreated patients. The expression of SOCS-1 was higher upon exposure to HIV-1 gp120 than LPS in 5 healthy controls assessed and their culture supernatants showed decreased levels of all the cytokines, mainly IL-6 and TNF-α.

Conclusions

Therapy naïve patients exhibit deficient DC maturation upon LPS stimulation, which is partially restored following antiretroviral treatment. An increased expression of SOCS-1 gene upon gp120 exposure suggests a possible role of SOCS-1 in DC impairment.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER)

Copyright

© Sachdeva et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2012

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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