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Fig. 2 | BMC Infectious Diseases

Fig. 2

From: SIV infection aggravates malaria in a Chinese rhesus monkey coinfection model

Fig. 2

The course and malaria-associated symptoms of Pc-infected and S + P coinfected monkeys. a Plasma viral loads of individual SIV-infected monkeys measured by real-time PCR. b Parasitemia levels in monkeys singly infected with Pc parasites (P group) or coinfected with SIV and Pc (S + P group). Parasitemia was measured daily by blood smears. Pc inoculation and chloroquine treatment are indicated by blue and red arrows, respectively. c Time period when patent parasitemia (> 0.1% RBCs) was detected during the acute (week 0–12) and chronic (week 12–26) stages of primary malaria (left) and following primary and secondary malaria (right). d Body temperature changes in the P and S + P groups. Body temperature was measured daily, and data are presented for individual animals. The mean body temperature (38.4 °C) of all animals measured from day − 7 to 0 of Pc infection is shown by a horizontal dotted line. One SD (0.3862 °C) and 2 SDs of the mean body temperature are indicated by the dark gray and light gray zones, respectively. A body temperature higher than 2 SDs of the mean was considered a fever. e Body weight changes in the two groups of animals relative to the day of Pc inoculation. f The greatest body weight changes in individual animals after Pc inoculation. The values are the ratios of the individual weight to the mean weight of the group before inoculation. The adjusted P value was calculated by multiple comparison tests with the Sidak correction, which was performed after repeated measures two-way ANOVA (interaction: P = 0.0824, SIV infection: P = 0.8164, Pc: P = 0.0025). g Changes in hemoglobin levels in animals in the P group and S + P group during the first 20 weeks of primary Pc infection. Data presented in C, E, F, and G are the mean ± SD. Unpaired t tests were used, and statistically significant differences are indicated with *(P < 0.05) or **(P < 0.01)

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