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Table 3 Reasons listed for not reporting pneumonia of unknown etiology (PUE) cases, by hospital, 2016

From: Lessons from an active surveillance pilot to assess the pneumonia of unknown etiology surveillance system in China, 2016: the need to increase clinician participation in the detection and reporting of emerging respiratory infectious diseases

Why the responsible clinician did not report the PUE case The Second Hospital of Fuyang City (N = 151) n(%, 95 CI*) The People’s Hospital of Luan City (N = 156) n(%, 95 CI) Total (N = 307) n(%, 95 CI)
Was not aware of PUE surveillance system 76 (50, 42–58) 156 (100, 98–100) 232 (76, 70–80)
Did not understand the PUE case definition 6 (4, 2–8) 156 (100, 98–100) 162 (53, 47–58)
In their assessment, the patient’s illness did not meet the PUE case definition 68 (45, 37–53) 0 (0, 0–2.4) 68 (22, 18–27)
Wanted to treat the patient longer prior to reporting 16 (11, 7–17) 0 (0, 0–2.4) 16 (5, 3–8)
The patient was transferred to another hospital or ward 6 (4, 2–8) 0 (0, 0–2.4) 6 (2, 1–4)
When a case is reported, the laboratory results are returned too late such that the testing is not helpful for diagnosis and treatment 2 (1, 0.4–4.7) 0 (0, 0–2.4) 2 (1, 0.2–2.3)
Thought the reporting procedure was complex 1 (1, 0.1–3.7) 0 (0, 0–2.4) 1 (0.3, 0.06–1.83)
Wanted to report only after seeing a relevant lab result, such as H5N1 avian influenza 1 (1, 0.1–3.7) 0 (0, 0–2.4) 1 (0.3, 0.06–1.83)
  1. *CI refers to Confidence Interval