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Table 2 The risk of tubal pathology (TP) in relation to the genotype of the single genes studied.

From: Do host genetic traits in the bacterial sensing system play a role in the development of Chlamydia trachomatis-associated tubal pathology in subfertile women?

   1.1 1.2 and 2.2
   n Risk of TP n Risk of TP
TLR9 -1237 T>C All subfertile women 155 (68%) 20% 72 (32%) 17%
  CT+ subfertile women 26 (67%) 62% 13 (33%) 77%
  Control group 66 (68%) - 31 (32%) -
TLR9 +2848 G>A All subfertile women 45 (20%) 18% 182 (80%) 19%
  CT+ subfertile women 6 (15%) 50% 33 (85%) 70%
  Control group 15 (15%) - 82 (85%) -
TLR4 +896 A>Ga All subfertile women 200 (88%) 19% 27 (12%) 22%
  CT+ subfertile women 33 (85%) 64% 6 (15%) 83%
  Control group 87 (90%) - 10 (10%) -
CD14 -260 C>Tb All subfertile women 60 (26%) 17% 167 (74%) 20%
  CT+ subfertile women 12 (31%) 67% 27 (69%) 67%
  Control group 26 (27%) - 71 (73%) -
CARD15/NOD2 All subfertile women 211 (93%) 18% 16 (7%) 25%
Leu1007fsinsC CT+ subfertile women 37 (95%) 65% 2 (5%) 100%
(SNP13) Control group 95 (98%) - 2 (2%) -
  1. All subfertile women: n = 227, of whom 19% has tubal pathology (TP).
  2. CT + (C. trachomatis IgG-positive) subfertile women: n = 39, of whom 67% has TP.
  3. Control group: n = 97 ethnically-matched healthy employees of the VU University Medical Center.
  4. 1.1 = normal genotype (homozygous for the common allele); 1.2 = heterozygous SNP carrier (one common allele and one rare allele); 2.2 = homozygous SNP carrier (homozygous for the rare allele).
  5. a Adapted from Morré et al., 2003 [1].
  6. b Adapted from Ouburg et al., 2005 [2].