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Open Peer Review

This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

How does Open Peer Review work?

CD4 cell count recovery among HIV-infected patients with very advanced immunodeficiency commencing antiretroviral treatment in sub-Saharan Africa

BMC Infectious Diseases20066:59

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-6-59

Received: 27 January 2006

Accepted: 21 March 2006

Published: 21 March 2006

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
27 Jan 2006 Submitted Original manuscript
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
13 Feb 2006 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Manuel Battegay
24 Feb 2006 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Robert Colebunders
3 Mar 2006 Author responded Author comments - Stephen Lawn
Resubmission - Version 3
3 Mar 2006 Submitted Manuscript version 3
7 Mar 2006 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Manuel Battegay
7 Mar 2006 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Robert Colebunders
16 Mar 2006 Author responded Author comments - Stephen Lawn
Resubmission - Version 4
16 Mar 2006 Submitted Manuscript version 4
16 Mar 2006 Author responded Author comments - Stephen Lawn
Resubmission - Version 5
16 Mar 2006 Submitted Manuscript version 5
Publishing
21 Mar 2006 Editorially accepted
21 Mar 2006 Article published 10.1186/1471-2334-6-59

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
The Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute for Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town
(2)
Clinical Research Unit, Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
(3)
Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town
(4)
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

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