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This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

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No excess risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes among women with serological markers of previous infection with Coxiella burnetii: evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort

  • Stine Yde Nielsen1, 2Email author,
  • Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen3,
  • Kåre Mølbak4,
  • Niels Henrik Hjøllund1, 5,
  • Bjørn Kantsø6,
  • Karen Angeliki Krogfelt7 and
  • Tine Brink Henriksen8
BMC Infectious Diseases201313:87

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-13-87

Received: 18 September 2012

Accepted: 14 February 2013

Published: 17 February 2013

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
18 Sep 2012 Submitted Original manuscript
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
20 Sep 2012 Author responded Author comments - Stine Yde Nielsen
Resubmission - Version 3
20 Sep 2012 Submitted Manuscript version 3
6 Dec 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Robert Massung
7 Dec 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Janna Munster
9 Dec 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Wim van der Hoek
22 Jan 2013 Author responded Author comments - Stine Yde Nielsen
Resubmission - Version 4
22 Jan 2013 Submitted Manuscript version 4
Publishing
14 Feb 2013 Editorially accepted
17 Feb 2013 Article published 10.1186/1471-2334-13-87

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article.. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Occupational Medicine, Regional Hospital West Jutland
(2)
Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej
(3)
Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen
(4)
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut
(5)
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital
(6)
Department of microbiology and infection control, Statens Serum Institut
(7)
Department of microbiology and infection control, Statens Serum Institut
(8)
Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit and Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Brendstrupgaardsvej

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