Open Access
Open Peer Review

This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

How does Open Peer Review work?

Erratum to: Prevalence of self-reported tuberculosis, knowledge about tuberculosis transmission and its determinants among adults in India: results from a nation-wide cross-sectional household survey

  • Chandrashekhar T Sreeramareddy1Email author,
  • HN Harsha Kumar2 and
  • John T Arokiasamy3
BMC Infectious Diseases201313:542

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-13-542

Received: 6 June 2013

Accepted: 28 October 2013

Published: 14 November 2013

The original article was published in BMC Infectious Diseases 2013 13:16

Correction

Following the publication of our article [1], we noticed that for calculation of prevalence rates (95% confidence intervals) of self-reported tuberculosis (TB) shown in Table 1 we had not considered sampling weights of complex survey design used in India Demographic Health Survey (DHS). We have re-analysed the data including the sampling weights to calculate weighted prevalence rates and their 95% CIs for self-reported TB in revised Table 1. The revised analysis was carried out using STATA/IC (version 10). The STATA code for revised analysis is available along with this correction article (Additional file 1). We request the readers to consider the corrected Table 1 shown here in place of Table 1 of the original manuscript [1]. In second paragraph of page five of original manuscript, an overall prevalence of self-reported TB should be read as 5.21 per 1000 participants. Revised analysis for Table 1 showed a clear gradient in prevalence of self-reported TB according to wealth index. For example, the richest had a lowest prevalence of self-reported TB (1.92 per 1000 population) and the poorest had the highest prevalence (10.5 per 1000 population). Chi square test was used to assess the statistical significance of the differences in weighted prevalence rates according to each demographic and socio-economic variables. The differences in weighted prevalence rates for all variables were statistically significant (p < 0.01). The readers should also consider the following additional statement in the conclusion: ‘Economically deprived populations are at most risk of TB and should be targeted by TB control programs in India’. We apologise the readers for confusion caused due to wrong analysis and thank Dr. Jason Andrews for drawing our attention towards this error.
Table 1

Weighted prevalence rates of self-reported tuberculosis among adult men (aged 15–59 years) and women (aged 15–49 years) by selected demographic and socio-economic characteristics

 

Sample (N)

Number reporting TB

Weighted prevalence per 1000 population

95% CIs

Overall Prevalence

198754

915

5.21

4.75, 5.67

Age

≤25 years

72300

187

2.87

2.29, 3.45

26-40 years

84639

423

5.65

4.94, 6.35

>40 years

41815

305

8.33

7.02, 9.64

Gender

Male

72369

443

7.12

6.21, 8.04

Female

124385

472

4.06

3.57, 4.55

Type of residence

Urban

95160

353

3.37

2.84, 3.91

Rural

103594

562

6.16

5.51, 6.8

Education

No education

50465

411

9.03

7.92, 10.15

Primary

29230

160

5.12

4.03, 6.21

Secondary

94627

308

3.21

2.69, 3.73

Higher

24389

36

1.19

0.61, 1.71

Wealth quintiles

Poorest

21162

119

10.52

8.84, 12.21

Poorer

27930

192

6.94

5.67, 8.21

Middle

38547

220

5.22

4.23, 6.21

Rich

49482

185

2.99

2.33, 3.66

Richest

61633

119

1.92

1.4, 2.44

Region of India

Northern India

31584

89

3.87

2.85, 4.89

North-eastern India

34776

233

7.43

5.50, 9.36

Central India

37987

199

5.69

4.79, 6.59

Western India

27707

126

5.3

4.17, 6.43

Eastern India

24606

146

7.44

6.02, 8.85

South India

42094

122

2.84

2.23, 3.45

* Chi square test was statistically significant (p < 0.01) for all variables.

Notes

Declarations

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University Tunku Abdul Rahman
(2)
Department of Community Medicine, Kasturba Medical College
(3)
Department of Community Medicine, International Medical University

References

  1. Sreeramareddy CT, Harsha Kumar HN, Arokiasamy JT: Prevalence of self-reported tuberculosis, knowledge about tuberculosis transmission and its determinants among adults in India: results from a nation-wide cross-sectional household survey. BMC Infect Dis. 2013, 13: 16-10.1186/1471-2334-13-16.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  2. Pre-publication history

    1. The pre-publication history for this paper can be accessed here:http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2334/13/542/prepub

Copyright

© Sreeramareddy et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Advertisement