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Open Peer Review

This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

How does Open Peer Review work?

The prevalence of anal human papillomavirus among young HIV negative men who have sex with men

  • Huachun Zou1,
  • Christopher K Fairley1, 2,
  • Jane S Hocking3,
  • Suzanne M Garland4,
  • Andrew E Grulich5 and
  • Marcus Y Chen1, 2Email author
BMC Infectious Diseases201212:341

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-12-341

Received: 20 September 2012

Accepted: 3 December 2012

Published: 9 December 2012

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
20 Sep 2012 Submitted Original manuscript
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
29 Oct 2012 Author responded Author comments - Huachun Zou
Resubmission - Version 3
29 Oct 2012 Submitted Manuscript version 3
29 Oct 2012 Author responded Author comments - Huachun Zou
Resubmission - Version 4
29 Oct 2012 Submitted Manuscript version 4
12 Nov 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Ross Cranston
24 Nov 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Maninder Singh Setia
Resubmission - Version 5
Submitted Manuscript version 5
Publishing
3 Dec 2012 Editorially accepted
9 Dec 2012 Article published 10.1186/1471-2334-12-341

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
School of Population Health, University of Melbourne
(2)
Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Alfred Health
(3)
Centre for Women’s Health, Gender and Society, School of Population Health, University of Melbourne
(4)
Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Royal Women’s Hospital and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne
(5)
Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales

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