Skip to main content

Advertisement

Open Access
Open Peer Review

This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

How does Open Peer Review work?

Impact of ethnicity and socio-economic status on Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia incidence and mortality: a heavy burden in Indigenous Australians

  • Steven Y C Tong1, 2, 7Email author,
  • Sebastian J van Hal3, 4,
  • Lloyd Einsiedel5,
  • Bart J Currie1, 2 and
  • John D Turnidge6
Contributed equally
BMC Infectious Diseases201212:249

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-12-249

Received: 20 February 2012

Accepted: 27 September 2012

Published: 9 October 2012

Back to article

Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
20 Feb 2012 Submitted Original manuscript
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
18 Apr 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Rachel Gordon
2 May 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Rosalyn Singleton
15 Jun 2012 Author responded Author comments - Steven Tong
Resubmission - Version 3
15 Jun 2012 Submitted Manuscript version 3
27 Aug 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Rosalyn Singleton
4 Sep 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Rachel Gordon
Resubmission - Version 4
Submitted Manuscript version 4
Publishing
27 Sep 2012 Editorially accepted
9 Oct 2012 Article published 10.1186/1471-2334-12-249

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Tropical and Emerging Infectious Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research
(2)
Department of Infectious Diseases, Royal Darwin Hospital
(3)
Department of Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital
(4)
Antibiotic Resistance & Mobile Elements Group, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Unit, School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney
(5)
Flinders University and the Northern Territory Clinical School
(6)
SA Pathology, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, North Adelaide, and University of Adelaide
(7)
the Australian New Zealand Cooperative on Outcomes in Staphylococcal Sepsis

Advertisement